Financial Freedom – Get It

THIS POST MAY CONTAIN AFFILIATE LINKS.  SEE MY FULL DISCLOSURE FOR DETAILS.

If my head were to split open, blobs of financial material would spill out.  The latest stock prices of Amazon, Veeva, Comcast/how much I plan to save this month/the order that my bills need to be paid to meet my savings plan/ Trump’s tax proposal and his idea of tax rates that are going to enhance working lives/what sector of the stock market is on the verge of growth/how much I plan to spend this month.  Small splashes of yoga poses that I plan on attempting might be in the brain matter, but at a minimal level.  I gave up on twisting myself into a helix years ago.  What I’m getting at is the majority of my mind is focused on financial elements.  I realized that most people don’t have a grip on this topic and I had an idea to put it into a book.

 

In How Ally Found Her Financial Freedom, I take the reader through common financial problems – no idea how to manage money, accumulating debt, little knowledge of financial instruments.  Ally is a working professional with no money management skills. She’s deep in debt and wonders why she impulsively spends money.  Ally acknowledges that she doesn’t have all the answers and finds a mentor.  Cue Victoria, a family friend that Ally feels has the accomplishments and successes that Ally longs for.   Victoria commits to her mentor role, providing sound advice and guidance.  Ally is compelled to examine how she thinks about money, especially her personal money script.  She’s challenged to think about money every day and remain disciplined.  Ally takes bite-size actions, baby steps to pursue financial contentment.

Continue reading “Financial Freedom – Get It”

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Money Scripts

saving, budgeting, financial-freedom
money-management

THIS POST MAY CONTAIN AFFILIATE LINKS.  SEE MY FULL DISCLOSURE FOR DETAILS.

We all have one.  A money script, that is.  Money scripts are underlying behavioral principles that dictate money habits.  You know, the ones that cause you to throw caution to the wind when strolling through Bed Bath & Beyond.  Surely you needed the extra five kitchen gadgets, especially the one that juices lemons while catching the pits. Money scripts are also responsible for having feelings of jealousy and bitterness hijack your senses at the sight of a Porsche whizzing by.

Based on indelibly etched experiences of life that form each person’s money habits, individuals form impressions of the significance of money and how it affects their life.  By absorbing messages from our environment, unconscious impressions about money form lifetime behaviors.  Often learned from parents and social settings, a money script based on dysfunctional patterns may lead a person to develop extreme habits like overspending or underspending, running deep into debt, or being so miserly as to forgo basic necessities.  While the money script remains hidden in the subconscious, the corresponding behaviors emerge on a daily basis, controlling a person’s actions without the individual understanding the reason for their habits.  Continue reading “Money Scripts”

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Feed The Pig

saving, budgeting, money-management
saving, budget, money-management

If I wanted to, I could fill this blog with posts of all the basic financial gems like budgeting templates, savings calculators, and mortgage interest rates.  Because there’s no shortage of said material, I’d like to talk about one of my favorite sites: Feed The Pig .

Feed The Pig is a National Public Service Campaign sponsored by the American Institute of CPAs and the Advertising Council.  The site’s mascot is not the most attractive pig I’ve seen, but stay with me.  His head is a piggy bank and that’s where the parallel message lies.

The presentation is meant to appeal to young people, or those that we’ve affectionately labeled the Millennials.  Us Baby Boomers would be remiss in our obligation to society if we failed to engage this genre.  According to SoFi (www.sofi.com), 39 percent of Millennials would rather disclose a preexisting sexually transmitted disease to a potential partner than reveal how much debt they have.

See the imminent need?  If you’re a Millennial, pay attention. Continue reading “Feed The Pig”

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My Car Is 20 Years Old

money-management, saving
saving

Ol’ reliable.  Isn’t she a beaut?  This baby is turning 20.  While most people would rather be seen in the back of a hearse than a car this old, I embrace its charm.  The visor sometimes falls in my lap, the radio volume lowers or becomes sharply louder when I hit a bump, and there’s that strange clicking when I put the fan setting on the front windshield.

She’s been sprayed a few times to cover up the bruises.  The front bumper is secure, but if you look closely, it’s slightly askew.  That’s left over from when an old man T-boned the passenger’s front quarter panel.  She’s been punched in the gut by shopping carts and side-swiped by careless drivers but she rides on like a champion.

You know that soft whistle-y sound when the aura enters the room in the Twilight Zone?  I hear that coming from under the hood.  Those sounds are helping me secure my future as I’m aggressively working towards an early retirement.

Of all the things we buy, our car is the most personal and sensitive.  Next to a house, it’s also the most expensive. And people love to judge, right?  We are all judged on what we drive.  Some will even determine if you are a good match for your car.  Like, “What’s that old geezer doing driving a Corvette? There should be a hot guy in the driver’s seat.”  Gotta love the American way.

Continue reading “My Car Is 20 Years Old”

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Financial Transformations

money-management
financial, money

THIS POST MAY CONTAIN AFFILIATE LINKS.  SEE MY FULL DISCLOSURE FOR DETAILS.

My short story, Jake’s Financial Transformation, is loosely based on someone that I knew in my late teens.  Blessed with the adroitness of an excellent carpenter, he took great pride in his work and started his own business at a young age.  Sadly, his skills as a carpenter and as a businessman were at opposite ends of the spectrum.  The business failed because he lacked basic business skills, like pricing a job competitively.  His estimates were often too high, resulting in lost opportunities.  When he did get hired, he dealt with cost overruns.  He simply couldn’t find a way to be profitable.  His alternative was to take a job with a contractor.  His money management deficiencies now surfaced in a different light.  On payday, he could make his take-home pay vanish before arriving home, like some latent magic ability.  For someone that was making a decent living, he was always broke.  This pattern occurred in tandem with a rotten attitude towards “the rich” and constant complaints about having to work for a living.  In his home, there was daily commiseration with his dad about “the rich”.  He was living out this destructive money script, oblivious to how he could transform the gift of his skill into a rewarding and successful reality.

I tried to help.  Together, we nailed down a plan for him to save $100 a week which should have been fairly seamless.  He lived with his parents and had limited expenses.  After imagining how he would have to tighten his expenses, he scoffed and didn’t give it a second thought.

Individuals that carry this kind of attitude are constantly in debt.  Because they never build a savings account and plan their purchases, they never have their own resources and must use the maximum credit provided to them for their home, car, or other large purchase.  If they have $500, their financial obligations match the $500 limit; if they have $1,000, their financial obligations match the $1,000 limit.  There’s never an excess and they’re always scraping by.  Any financial emergencies become fire drills and inevitably create a setback.  Banks and credit card companies love these people.  These are the consumers that live on the financial hamster wheel.  Earn, spend, earn, owe.  Rinse, repeat.

Jake personifies those that don’t have a clue.  They don’t know what they’re good at or what they want from life.  In their little bubble of the world, life just happens.  Many people wallow in self-defeat, not realizing that a life of satisfaction is not a far leap.  They struggle along, thinking that the “good life” is beyond their achievability.  Often, they’re frustrated and they don’t even know why.  These mental chains prevent people from developing useful skills, resulting in untapped talent.

Feeling in control seems like an impossible state to this unenlightened bunch.  What Jake learns from some prodding by his older cousin is that he needs to come up with a plan and figure out his life.  Jake only knows one song and it keeps playing over and over in his head.  But nothing changes unless actions change.  Eventually, Jake experiences a breakthrough and soon realizes that he needs to acquire some education in the field that he knows – cars.  He takes his part-time job activity and turns it into a full-time, marketable skill.  With some basic money skills, he builds up a small savings account and starts to see his life taking shape.

I believe that everyone has the ability to attain self-sustenance.  In Jake, I show the reader that someone with an uncertain beginning can unwind their destructive habits and find their way.   Anyone can create a vision from a blank screen in small, focused steps and find fulfillment.

Dr. Brad Klontz writes extensively about money scripts. More on that in future posts.

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investing

Investment Compounding Schedule

 

THIS POST MAY CONTAIN AFFILIATE LINKS.  SEE MY FULL DISCLOSURE FOR DETAILS.

I devised this schedule to predict what my future investments would be worth.  The typical Future Value calculation involves taking today’s account balance, applying an interest rate and the number of periods for compounding. 

That’s great if you are working with only one balance at one given time. 

Because I make regular deposits into my investment accounts, I wanted to increase the balances at different intervals.  I created quarterly segments where any additional investment can be entered.  The formula will take the new end-of-quarter balance and apply the compounding. This repeats for all quarters. 

The yellow fields are the input fields.  The investment account balances can be entered at the top left.  You will see the entire schedule update as soon as an investment balance is entered.  Amounts can be entered in all the “Cash Invested” fields. 

At the end of the schedule, I calculate a cash flow amount based on the final balance.  I have used a conservative 3.5% return.  Below, I have a short list of estimated living expenses. Both cash flow and living expenses can be calculated on a monthly or annual basis.

If you’re good at Excel, you change alter the rates and add rows for additional years.  Let me know what you think of the schedule. I hope you find it useful.

Inv Compounding

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money-management

Welcome to my blog

Welcome to my blog.

I think about money 24/7.  Doesn’t everyone?  Maybe not.  That’s why this blog will serve as my outlet to share my thoughts with the world.  It’s a healthy way to get these thoughts out of my head.

Money issues are universal.  Even if people don’t readily talk about money, it’s still an issue, whether or not they want to admit it.  I find money management interesting and tied to every other aspect of life.

My interest in finances started early in life.  I learned to not want to be struggling like my parents and they always seemed to be struggling.  When I was very young, I remember living comfortably.  After a few years, my parents built a brand-new home and soon, they were in over their heads.  By then, my mother was never indulgent and the struggling was palpable. It became worse after my parents divorced.  My mother had no job-related skills and took a low-paying secretarial job.  My dad ran his own business, but it was pretty slim living by then.

People learn what they’re taught and I guess they never had the best education in managing money.  My mother was told not to go to college, that I know as a fact.  The other messages that she silently passed down were probably learned from some previous experience.  One very strong impression I remember was a doozie: don’t expect too much of life.  Sad, isn’t it?

Continue reading “Welcome to my blog”

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